Exhibition of work by four Sarnia-area photographers opens Saturday

Exhibition of work by four Sarnia-area photographers opens Saturday

Gallery in the Grove’s 2024 exhibition season opens Saturday with Looking Through Their Lens, a show by four Sarnia-area photographers.

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Gallery in the Grove’s 2024 exhibition season opens Saturday with Looking Through Their Lens, a show by four Sarnia-area photographers.

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Work by Glenn Ogilvie, Mary Kilbreath, Scott Clarke and Shaun Antle will be exhibited through Feb. 3 in the art gallery upstairs at the Bright’s Grove library.

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“This is a special exhibition,” said Sylva Foreman, who co-chairs the show, in a release. “All four of these local photographers bring a unique interpretation of photography to the gallery.”

Ogilvie started as a photojournalist in the early 1970s in the Dunnville area.

“I was a freelancer for the Star, and the Spec (Hamilton Spectator) and the Globe and Mail – anybody who would take my work,” he said.

He later came to Sarnia where he had a long newspaper career before retiring.

Recently, he worked on Stories From the Street, a project with Sarnia reporter Cathy Dobson about homeless people in the city.

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While wrapping up that project, he was approached by the volunteer-run gallery about being part of the group show.

“My subject matter is very personal,” Ogilvie said of his 12 pieces in the exhibition. “It’s places I like to be.”

Ogilvie spends time canoeing and hiking, both locally and on trips north, and takes a camera with him.

His show images were printed using methods dating back to the 1850s.

“I make computer-generated negatives and then I contact print them with watercolour paper that has been hand-coated with a solution,” he said.

It’s a challenging, time-consuming and “very tedious” process, with time, temperature, humidity and other factors in play, Ogilvie said. “You have to really to work at a print to get it to a show quality.”

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The result is a “very soft” image that’s not “as crystal clear as a modern-day print,” he said.

“I just like the feel of it,” he said. “For me, it’s realistic. I think modern printing is wonderful, it’s dynamic but sometimes it goes beyond reality . . . It’s just too pumped up with sharpness.”

Clarke is a retired city police officer and photographer who create “The Harry Project” several years ago about well-known Sarnia resident Harry Kewley, Ogilvie said.

“(Clarke) does a lot of work in Cuba,” Ogilvie added. “He has friends down there and he goes down and visits.”

Gallery in the Grove
Havana, a photograph by Scott Clarke, from the Gallery in the Grove exhibition, Looking Through Their Lens. Handout

Clarke is showing a collection of images “that are deeply meaningful to him and represent family, culture, architecture and travel,” the gallery said.

Kilbreath’s father, the late Fred Kilbreath, owned a Mitton Street photo studio for many years, Ogilvie said.

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“She’s a painter and she likes to take photographs and paint them later,” he said. “Her work is really interesting.”

“Mary’s untitled series of flowers in this exhibition reflects her gentle approach to the fragile subject,” the gallery said,

Antle’s offerings showcase his technical and artistic abilities “while taking the viewers on a journey through our stunning landscapes, reflecting on the little things and spotlighting our beautiful wildlife,” the gallery said.

“Those three are just so talented,” Ogilvie said.

An opening reception is set for Saturday, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the gallery at 2618 Hamilton Rd.

For more on the gallery and upcoming shows, visit galleryinthegrove.com.

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