Month: June 2021

The women photographers series: Patricia de Melo Moreira

Paris – “Women have been using cameras since photography was first invented, officially in 1839. They have gone out in public, travelled to unknown lands, observed the world, covered wars, invented new techniques and displayed genius and avant-garde artistic innovation,” says AFP’s head of photography, Marielle Eudes. “And yet most of their names are still hardly known. Women have stayed in the shadow of history, unseen, erased.”

Photographers like Frances Benjamin Johnston, Alice Shalek, Elizabeth “Lee” Miller, Gerda Taro, Eve Arnold, Dorothea Lange, Francoise Huguier and Sabine Weiss have all helped shape the technique and art of photography. A 

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Greenwood Village welcomes sprawling entertainment complex Pindustry | News

When Greenwood Village created the Arapahoe Entertainment District, longtime Centennial developer Kelmore Development wasted no time putting together a plan to transform an old automobile service center building it owned on Arapahoe Road just west of I-25.

On Sunday, residents and visitors will get the first look at the sprawling entertainment complex that is Pindustry, 7939 E. Arapahoe Road. Offerings from the “adult playground” occupying the two-level, 54,000-sqaure foot building include the area’s first serious offering of Duckpin bowling, regular bowling, an impressive pinball machine collection and one of metro Denver’s largest rooftop patios with an unobstructed view of the

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National Archives’ racism task force says own Rotunda example of ‘structural racism,’ knocks Founding Fathers

The National Archives’ task force on racism claimed in a little-noticed report to the U.S.’s top librarian that the Archives’ own Rotunda – which houses the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights – is an example of “structural racism” and that the Founding Fathers and other White, historically impactful Americans are portrayed too positively.

The report was completed in April and released this month but has so far flown under the media radar. The task force claims that structural racism “unequivocally impacts” how National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) employees interact with each other, customers

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Christoph Waltz and Sam Neill to Star in The Portable Door Movie


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The Portable Door, a series of novels by Patrick Holt, is receiving a film adaptation that will star Sam Neill and Christoph Waltz. The Portable Door is a fantasy adventure that follows two interns who start working at a mysterious firm where many of the employees are involved with magic.

Patrick Gibson, who was a series regular on Netflix’s The OA, also stars, as well as Lord of the Rings actress Miranda Otto. The rest of the cast includes Chris Pang (Crazy Rich Asians), Jessica De Gouw (Gretel & Hansel),

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playerWON launches to bring TV ads to console games

After months of testing, marketers are finally going to be able to start running video ads within console and PC games.

Why it matters: In-game advertising, a linchpin of mobile gaming, could be very lucrative for console and PC developers. But studios have been hesitant to adopt them, fearing that a clunky ad experience would mess with user engagement.

Driving the news: A first-of-its-kind in-game advertising platform called playerWON launches this week, allowing big-name marketers that are used to running splashy TV ads the ability to target younger demographics with similar types of spots that will run in video games.

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Entertainment complex comes to Greenwood Village

At full capacity, Pindustry will need up to 200 employees to serve up to 2,300 customers.

GREENWOOD VILLAGE, Colo. — When Greenwood Village created the Arapahoe Entertainment District, longtime Centennial developer Kelmore Development wasted no time putting together a plan to transform an old automobile service center building it owned on Arapahoe Road just west of Interstate 25.

On Sunday, residents and visitors will get the first look at the sprawling entertainment complex that is Pindustry, 7939 E. Arapahoe Road. Offerings from the “adult playground” occupying the two-level, 54,000-square foot building include the area’s first serious offering of Duckpin

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Cult Art Space Founder Lia Gangitano on Championing Queer Art Outside the Mainstream

New York has had few art nonprofits as dearly beloved as Participant Inc. While predecessors such as Art in General and Exit Art eventually retired, the esteemed Lower East Side institution has only grown stronger in its two decades of programming mainly queer art. And the experimental landmark’s East Houston location has become a kind of unofficial community hub for New York’s avant-garde since it moved to the humble storefront in 2007.

Behind the institution’s cult-like following is founder and director Lia Gangitano, who has unwaveringly championed boundary-pushing art that New York museums still often fail to recognize. Whether photographs

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Retired Black officer, Black Air Force veteran killed in possible hate crime: DA

The shooting deaths Saturday in Winthrop, Massachusetts, of retired state trooper David Green and retired Air Force Staff Sgt. Ramona Cooper were the work of someone with “disturbing” beliefs but no other threat has been identified, Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins said Monday.

The suspect, identified as 28-year-old Nathan Allen, allegedly rammed a stolen truck into a house before fatally shooting the two victims, who were both Black, according to police. Authorities said they are investigating the incident as a hate crime.

Allen was later killed by police when they tried to apprehend him, investigators said.

Green, 58, and Cooper,

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Queer Filmmaker and Archivist Jenni Olson Receives Special Teddy Award

A jack-of-all-trades of LGBTQ cinema, the filmmaker and historian gets her due with a special Teddy Award.

After decades of toiling in relative obscurity, Jenni Olson is finally receiving the industry recognition she deserves. Her collection of rare 35mm and 16mm queer film prints was acquired by Harvard’s Film Archive last summer. Her films “The Joy of Life” (2005) and “The Royal Road” (2015), which both premiered at Sundance, recently became available on the Criterion Channel alongside her many short films. She was a 2018 MacDowell fellow, and is in development on her third feature-length essay film, “The Quiet World,”

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